We are losing the fight against Nature, when are we going to give up?

For those who don’t know what is going on, is very simple, greenhouse gases allow shortwave radiation from the sun to pass through the atmosphere and warm the Earth’s surface. The energy that then radiates out from the surface, longwave radiation, is trapped by the same greenhouse gases, warming the air, oceans, and land. When coal, oil, and natural gas are burned, they release enormous amounts of greenhouse gases — especially carbon dioxide, or CO2, which is by far the most prevalent. The gases add up much faster in the atmosphere than natural processes can absorb them, and thereby wreak Earth’s climate system.

To date, warming and melting of the Arctic has occurred far faster than was projected, leading some scientists to conclude that the Arctic could be ice free in the summer as early as 2012. If the Greenland ice sheet were to melt completely, sea level would rise about 20 feet, leaving hundreds of millions of coastal residents — people, plants, animals — homeless. And severe weather events like hurricanes, droughts, and heat waves, already on the rise, will occur more frequently than ever. Countless other disastrous outcomes, many of which can’t be precisely modeled for predictive purposes, make climate change a looming threat.If things continue the way they are by 2050 this will amount to 35 percent of all plant and animal life currently in existence — at least a million species.

IS A FULL OUT WAR

Humans have added so much greenhouse gases that the greenhouse effect that first made life possible now threatens the world as we know it.

The “War Against Nature” is escalating at an exponential rate throughout the world and the bloating population of humans are now feeling the wrath of climate disruption and the consequences of razing its magnificent jungles. Today there are more severe and frequent floods displacing a half of a million people regularly, massive hillside slums, droughts, hurricanes, extinction of fauna and flora and unimaginable squalor with nil by way of sanitation for people.

 

Some Facts

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Who is causing the most damage to Nature?

where

global_warming_exist

Nature fights back… Who is most likely to get hurt?

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We all lose!

impact

The bottom line…

money

How to stop this war against nature?

Governments can take several steps to reduce the threat of global warming. First and foremost, the United States and other industrial nations must use less of the fossil fuels — especially coal, oil, and gasoline — that produce carbon dioxide, the most significant heat-trapping gas. Industrial countries are responsible for the largest share of worldwide emissions of heat-trapping gases. But these nations also have a great ability to switch to cutting-edge energy technologies that produce fewer of these emissions.

The nations of the world must negotiate a climate change treaty with legally binding limits on emissions of heat-trapping gases.

The United States can reduce its carbon-dioxide emissions through four principal strategies that make use of new energy technologies: improving energy efficiency, developing renewable energy resources such as solar and wind power, reducing gasoline consumption for transportation, and switching from coal and oil to natural gas.

Improve Energy Efficiency

The less energy we use, the less carbon dioxide we will produce. Over the past 20 years, American industry and consumers have begun to switch to more-efficient motors, vehicles, appliances, windows, and manufacturing processes. This switch has saved considerable energy and money, but much greater efficiency is possible.

Develop Renewable Energy

Clean, safe, renewable sources, such as solar, wind, and sustainably grown biomass (plant matter), can provide us with energy but do not contribute to global warming. These technologies are ready to be deployed much more widely, but government policies must encourage their use.

Reduce Gasoline Consumption for Transportation

Cars, trucks, and buses consume over half of the oil used in the United States. Highly efficient gasoline-powered cars, and alternatively fueled vehicles such as electric and fuel-cell cars and buses, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions by using less or no gasoline. In addition, policies can encourage consumers to drive less and to use alternatives to single-passenger automobile trips, such as carpools, bicycles, and public transportation.

Switch from Coal and Oil to Natural Gas

Although natural gas is a fossil fuel, it produces less carbon dioxide than either coal or oil. Changing from coal to natural gas for generating electricity and from oil to natural gas for home heating is thus desirable as a quick fix, even though these switches alone cannot reduce carbon dioxide emissions nearly as much as is necessary.

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Additional Government Steps

Reducing American use of coal, oil, and gasoline would start to address the global warming threat, but other steps, such as transferring technology to developing countries, preserving forests, decreasing atmospheric methane, continuing to phase out CFCs, and slowing down population growth, are also important. They can also provide benefits in addition to reducing global warming. Forest preservation, for example, would protect endangered species, while slower population growth would make it easier to supply adequate food for all the world’s people.

Transfer Technology to Developing Countries

American businesses, the government, and international organizations need to find ways to transfer advanced energy technologies to developing countries, so that those nations can build their economies without having to use the older, polluting fossil fuel technologies that the industrial countries are now trying to phase out.

Preserve and Plant Forests

Trees take in carbon dioxide and use it to grow. Deforestation, especially in the tropics where many of the largest, most important forests are located, contributes significantly to global warming. Efforts to preserve forests and to plant trees on deforested land are essential not only for preventing global warming but also for preserving biodiversity.

Decrease Methane in the Atmosphere

Although methane contributes much less to global warming than does carbon dioxide, it is still responsible for about 15 percent of the problem. Among other steps to decrease methane emissions, the nations of the world can prevent leaks from natural gas pipelines, cut methane emissions from landfills, and reduce their use of beef for food.

Continue to Phase Out CFCs

Because chlorofluorocarbons are responsible for depleting the protective ozone layer, the nations of the world have agreed to stop using them. These chemicals also trap heat, so vigilance in enforcing the international agreements to phase out their use will help slow global warming as well.

What Businesses can do?

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Your turn to take action….

Climate change affects us all. Here are tips on how you can personally make a difference.

At Home – reduce, reuse, recycle!

  • Buy minimally packaged goods
  • Recycle paper, plastic, glass, and metal. Reuse, mend, and repurpose things to save money and divert waste from your local landfill
  • Plug air leaks in windows and doors to increase energy efficiency
  • Adjust your thermostat, lower in winter, higher in summer
  • Replace old appliances with energy efficient models and light bulbs
  • Save electricity by plugging appliances into a power strip and turning them off completely when not in use
  • Wash clothes in cold or warm water
  • Run dishwashers only when full and don’t use heat to dry dishes
  • Eat less meat, poultry, and fish
  • Plant Trees – Enter tree planting pledges online, then plant indigenous or locally appropriate trees where you live. View results of tree planting efforts globally.

At Work and On the Go

  • Print double-sided or not at all
  • Always use reusable cups, knives and forks.
  • Think before you travel. If a video conference call will suffice, spare the hassle and expense, and CO2 emissions.
  • Avoid traffic jams and decrease your personal carbon footprint by walking, bicycling, and using mass transit whenever possible. Consider carpooling with friends, neighbors, and co-workers.
  • Taking the stairs can sometimes be faster than waiting in long elevator lines. In addition to saving energy, taking the stairs gives you a mild workout which will help keep you healthy.
  • Have your business join the UN Global Compact and become part of the solution for two of today’s largest scale environmental issues – Climate Change and Water Sustainability.Here are some additional tips on how to kick the CO2 habit 

Know Your Carbon Footprint

Find out how much CO2 your lifestyle produces and the amount of resources it takes to live the way you do. Once you know the impact your lifestyle causes you can start to make adjustments and monitor improvement. Encourage others to do the same. Calculate CO2 emissions resulting from your air travel.

Learn More — Knowledge is power.

Speak up!
You can raise your voice to combat climate change by asking your local and national authorities to engage in environmentally-friendly measures.

Visit one of these organizations for more information

Beginner’s Guide to CSS3

Ever since the announcement of in 2005, the development of the level 3 of Cascading Style Sheet or better known as CSS3 has been closely watched and monitored by many designers and developers. All of us excited to get our hands on the new features of CSS3 – the text shadows, borders with images, opacity, multiple backgrounds, etc, just to name a few.

As of today, not all selectors of CSS3 are fully supported yet. But that doesn’t mean we can’t have some fun testing new CSS3 stuff. This post is dedicated to all designers and developers who are already familiar with CSS 2.1 and want to get your hands dirty on CSS3.0.

It’s a compilation of useful CSS3 reads, sample codes, tips, tutorials, cheat-sheets and more. Feel free to use them in your projects, just make sure it falls gracefully on incompatible browsers.

Getting Started with CSS3

Introduction to CSS3

An (roadmap) official introduction to CSS and CSS3. This document gives you an overall idea on the development of CSS3.

css3 roadmap Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3: Take design to next level

Advantages of CSS3, with explanations and examples of CSS3 properties and selectors.

next level Beginners Guide to CSS3

Several tricks with CSS3

Webmonkey brings you through several basic tricks in CSS3, including rounded borders, borders, drop shadows, image tricks and more.

Several tricks with CSS3 Beginners Guide to CSS3

Interview: Six questions with Eric Meyer on CSS3

Folks at Six Revision interviewed Eric Meyer with valuable insights and answers on CSS3.

eric meyer Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3: Progressive Enhancement

How you can use graceful (or, progressive) enhancement techniques to make use of CSS3 features in browsers that support them, while ensuring that your code will still provide a satisfactory user experience in older browsers that do not yet support those features.

css3 progressive enhancement Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3: Background and Borders

Rounded borders (border-radius)

A guide to creating rounded border with CSS3′s border-radius property.

css rounded borders Beginners Guide to CSS3

Rounded borders with image (border-images)

How to use images in borders with border-image property.

css image border Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3 borders, backgrounds and boxes

Detail explanation with examples of new CSS3 properties like: background-clip, background-origin, background-attachment, box-shadow, box-decoration-break, border-radius and border-image.

CSS3 borders backgrounds and boxes Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3: Text

Letterpress Effect

Create simple letterpress effect with CSS3.

letterpress effect Beginners Guide to CSS3

Six text effects using text shadow

Text effects include: vintage/retro, neon, inset, anaglyphic, fire and board game.

css text effect Beginners Guide to CSS3

Text emboss

How to correctly add an embossed effect to any text depending on the colors used.

text emboss Beginners Guide to CSS3

Beautiful typography

How to take basic markup and transform it into an attractive and beautiful typographical design through pure CSS3.

Beautiful typography Beginners Guide to CSS3

Text Rotation

Uses an image sprite and a sprinkle of CSS to get things positioned right.

text rotation Beginners Guide to CSS3

Outline Text

How to add an outline, or stroke, to your text using the CSS3 text-stroke property.

text outline Beginners Guide to CSS3

Text masking effect

Interactive text masking effect using the text-shadow CSS property.

text shadow Beginners Guide to CSS3

Link nudging (animation) with CSS3

Ditch Javascript and create nudge effect entirely with CSS3.

text nudge Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS Selection Styling

Change text selection styling with CSS3.

text highlight Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3: Menu

Multiple-columns content

Using CSS3 to create a set of columns on your website without having to assign individual layers and (or) paragraphs for each column.

multiple columns Beginners Guide to CSS3

Sexy Tooltips with Just CSS

How to use the evolving CSS standard can enhance some lovely cross-browser tooltips.

Sexy Tooltips Beginners Guide to CSS3

More tooltips:

CSS3 & jQuery Drop-Down Menu With Integrated Forms

jQuery and CSS3 powered navigation menu that supports integrated forms.

CSS3 & jQuery Drop Down Menu Beginners Guide to CSS3

Dropdown menu

How to create a Apple.com alike multi-level dropdown menu using border-radius, box-shadow, and text-shadow.

dropdown menu Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3-Only Tabbed Area

Click on a tab, hide all the panels, show the one corresponding to tab just clicked on – all with CSS.

CSS3 Only Tabbed Area Beginners Guide to CSS3

3D Ribbons with CSS3

Create nice looking 3D ribbons with only CSS3.

3d ribbons Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3: Drop shadow

Drop shadow in image

Showcase several techniques and some of the possible appearances for dropping shadows without using images.

Drop shadow in image Beginners Guide to CSS3

Glow Tabs with Box Shadow

How to create intuitive and beautiful tabs in CSS3 with no image.

Glow Tabs with Box Shadow Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3 boxes without using images

15 different styles of boxes without using images. Works in Chrome and Safari.

CSS3 boxes without using images Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS3: Buttons

Tutorial: Pretty buttons

How to create beautiful cross-browser compliant CSS3 buttons that degrade gracefully.

pretty css3 buttons Beginners Guide to CSS3

Tutorial: Dynamic buttons

How to create nice looking, dynamic buttons that are fully scaleable using the new CSS3 properties border-radius, box-shadow and RGBa.

dynamic css3 button Beginners Guide to CSS3

Speech Bubbles

Various forms of speech bubble effect created with CSS 2.1 and enhanced with CSS3.

speech bubble Beginners Guide to CSS3

BonBon buttons

CSS buttons that are sexy looking, really flexible, but with the most minimalistic markup as possible.

BonBon buttons Beginners Guide to CSS3

Github alike buttons

Collection of buttons that show what is possible using CSS3 while also maintaining the simplest possible markup.

Github alike buttons Beginners Guide to CSS3

Spinning, Fading Icons with CSS3 and MooTools

How to use CSS3 and MooTools to create dymanic, rotating elements.

Spinning, Fading Icons Beginners Guide to CSS3

 

CSS3: transparency and overlay

Opacity and transparency

Create image transparency with CSS3.

css3 opacity Beginners Guide to CSS3

Image overlay

Practical application of the CSS3 border-image property.

CACTC3 awesome overlays Beginners Guide to CSS3

More

Cheatsheets & References

CSS3 Cheat Sheet (PDF)

Printable cheatsheat with complete list of all properties, selector types and allows values in the current CSS3 specification from the W3C.

CACTC12 css 3 cheat sheet pdf Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS Support in Opera 9.5

Complete list of the supported CSS selectors in Opera 0.5.

opera 95 css Beginners Guide to CSS3

Fonts Available for @font-face Embedding

Comprehensive list of fonts currently licensed for @font-face embedding.

font face Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS 3 Selectors – Explained

A guide and reference to CSS3 selectors and its patterns.

css3 selectors Beginners Guide to CSS3

Cross-browser CSS3 Rule Generator

CSS3 rules you can copy and paste onto your own stylesheet.

CSS3 Click Chart

Get CSS3 styles like boz sizing, border radious, text shadow, and more within a click.

click chart Beginners Guide to CSS3

CSS Content & Browser Compatibility

Complete list of selector tables of both CSS and CSS3 with declaration for browser-compatibility check.

content browser compatibility Beginners Guide to CSS3
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